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metering indoors and using bounce flash

Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
edited December 2010 in flash & lighting
Stephen Tang asked:


Hi Neil,
I was searching your site about "bounce flash" since I haven't been
doing much of that of late.

In this blog entry
(http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/10/03/photography-questions-004/),
you write this:

"increasing flash will eliminate ambient light - It doesn’t quite work
the way as stated there. If you have correct exposure for ambient
light, then adding (correctly metered) flash to this, will just
over-expose the photograph."

If the ambient light indoors was bright enough (and directional
enough) to light the subject (no shadows under the eyes), then I would
not need to use flash at all, like you describe here:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2010/08/20/direction-of-light-choice-of-background-01/

I was looking at these pages:
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2009/12/19/bounce-flash-wedding-receptions/
http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-photography-techniques/4-bouncing-flash/

You don't have any ambient light photos in these blog entries, but I
presume that you used flash, because the ambient light was not quite
enough to keep your subject well-lit. So effectively, your subject
was in the shade, so you have a situation that you describe here (top
part):
http://neilvn.com/tangents/2009/08/26/exposure-metering-and-flash/

Obviously, you were modified the FEC to determine if the flash was
dominant or acting as a fill.

I ask this, because I am not sure if I have an "Aha!" moment. The
metering techniques you taught during our off-camera workshop seem
similar to metering indoors with bounce flash, since the bounce
surface is the "softbox." I've noticed in your indoor (wedding)
photography, when you don't want the flash to dominate, you have an
FEC that acts a bit more like fill flash, but it's not -3 to -5 EV.
You are around -1.3 to -1.7 EV.



Sincerely,
Stephen

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