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How to prevent .xmp file from appearing

Hi, 

There are several reasons why I prefer Photoshop CS4 to CS6. One is that in CS4 these annoying "sidecar" .xmp files do not appear next to a photo's thumbnail each time you open a photo. It adds the step of putting this .xmp file in the trash. Takes a ton of time if you're processing hundreds of photos. 

But now I have a new computer and unless I can get it back, CS4 may be gone. For now I have to use CS6. 

Is there a way of preventing these .xmp files from showing up when I open photos? Driving me crazy. 

Thank you!

Comments

  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015


    Yep. Sure can.

    Menu Bar/Edit then:

    image


    image

    Then simply OK it.

    PS: You do know though don't you, that if you *delete* those 'stupid .xmp files' (lol) if you re-open the RAW file again, any settings you had put in there are lost?

    Trev
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015


    Oh, also if you still want to delete any old ones; instead of having to select one by one and deleting the .xmp Sidecar files, what you do is when on your folder of images at top in the Search Bar, type in whichever format you are looking for, as in .xmp then all, and only all, the .xmp files will now be visible, select all in one hit and delete.


    image


    image

    Trev

    HINT: I use that a lot as sometimes I may do quick edits in a folder full of RAW files, resaving the jpegs back into the same folder for 'sneak peeks' for bride as they want a couple of quick images for 'thank you cards' so instead of then having to search through hundreds of Raw files looking for the .jpg ones, in less then 10 seconds I have them all listed by themselves and can grab in one hit.


  • OK that's awesome news. Thanks Trev! I will try that. Looks easy enough. What a relief. Seriously, this has been bugging me for years and one reason I stayed with CS4. Still, I like CS4 better all the way around but this is a big one so you've made my life easier. 

    No, I did not know (until yesterday) about losing the RAW changes if I delete the .xmp files. I only just discovered that when I deleted the files and then opened the image(s) again and my changes were gone. So your note confirmed what I thought was going on. It's not possible to underestimate my tech abilities here. (Overestimate?). But thanks.
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    Skip,

    Yep, that is why Raw files are "indestructible" since all settings are stored in a 'Sidecar file' or, in a Camera Raw Database, so no matter how many times you change it, you can always revert back to any state, which obviously you cannot do with a jpeg/psd/tif, etc. because once those are changed and saved, they are embedded within the file itself.

    Glad you are a happy camper again.

    Trev


  • Thanks again Trev! Yes, I agree, it's a good thing -- RAW files are negatives and should always remain 'as shot'. 
  • Hi Trev, one more question, the color setting default on Photoshop 6 is Adobe RGB. Would it be better to switch to sRGB? For events I give clients a flash drive of edited photos. For portrait clients most of the delivered images are prints though they often also buy digital images. 

    Thanks.
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    Skip,

    Personally, yes. If you go to THIS THREAD and scroll down to my 'colour space' chart/post and read it, that will explain it.

    I know you are also on a Mac, and you should have your Color Space Settings similar to mine, and some people will probably say 'you are on a Mac so therefore you need to have your Gamma set to 1.8, IGNORE that, that's OLD SCHOOL, check to see if your Gamma is 2.2 as it's supposed to be. This also goes for Calibrating monitors on Macs, Gamma 2.2 not 1.8, that's really old legacy Macs as in 15 years back or so.

    I have several versions of Photoshop (CS5 being the last GOOD crop set up btw) so I have CS6 set up as shown in my screenshot. Actually they are all like that.

    Ignore the Unscynchronised message at top regarding my 'Suite' just means because I change Photoshop to sRGB instead of the default Adobe RGB other programs like InDesign are not synced.

    Now, if you have been using Adobe RGB all this time in editing, if you open up any images you will get a warning about Embedded/Working Color Space not the same, just choose 'Working' or... in Photoshop go to Edit/Color Settings then UNtick the Profile Mismatches, but you really should convert to sRGB if doing that, so you could also choose that automatically (after choosing sRGB in the main menu at top) go to:

    Color Management Policies (2nd 'panel' from top in that same Color Settings Palette) and in the RGB drop down menu, choose 'Convert to Working RGB.

    Obviously you have already found that Color Space settings in ACR by your image, you need to equal that in Photoshop now.

    Trev



    image
  • Thanks very much Trev! I will look at that thread. That gamma info is good to know too. I remember the 2.2 setting from the times I've tried to calibrate my external monitors, did not know it could be set like this.

    I HATE the CS 6 crop tool. I can't see what's going on. It's the worst. Can't wait to get CS4 back. The other incredibly annoying thing about 6 is that that big gray palette against which the pix open does not go away when you close the photos!!! It sits there in the way of everything until you also close that.

    I'll switch to sRGB and check out the details in the thread you liked here.

    Thanks again.
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    What do you mean 'big gray palette'; do you mean photoshop's background colour?


    image
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    Also re-reading your post, the 'gamma' set in Photoshop is it's own thing, the gamma you set in your Monitor's Calibration software is also necessary to pre-set when calibrating.

    Trev
  • Thanks Trev. Not sure it's the same palette. Here are two images of my palette, which I wish would close when I close a photo in Photoshop (or not open at all). In the other PS versions, you open a photo and of course you get all the tools on the side but there's no separate palette as there is with 6. So, each time you close a photo you need to then also hit the red button on upper left of palette to close that too or it's in the way of everything, especially the folder of pix you are working with. You can slide the palette out of the way to the side but then newly opened photos will open way to the side and you have to drag to center. Fine if it's one or two photos but not fine with a couple of hundred. 

    In the first photo (with blocked out man) you see the gray palette open behind the image you're working with. In second photo, I've closed the photo of the man but the palette says open. 

    Thanks for clarification of 2.2 gamma setting.
  • OMG now the extract tool is gone. This just keeps getting worse. I did 'net search and looks like extract tool was replaced by a Refine Edge tool. Great. 

    Dear Adobe: If it ain't broke..... Don't fix it!
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015
    Skip, let's sort out some 'definitions' first up.

    That blank area you are concerned with is not a 'palette' it's Photoshop's background (which by the way should be changed to a neutral gray so it does not influence your eyes when editing).

    You are looking at Photoshop in it's entirety, and normally your image resides inside and personally you should also have PS expanded to full size so you cannot see anything at all on your desktop's background, everything will influence your eyes while editing.

    Another thing, you do know you can also run PS in 'Tabs' as in all your open images can be like a internet browser with different 'pages', ie: images open so you only see one at a time unless you click on a Tab to then view an image?

    So, if you wanted to open more than 1 image at a time, but don't want those pesky individual image windows, set up your Preferences.

    Edit/Preferences/Interface... and check the 'Open Documents as Tabs' in the 'Options' Panel:




    image

    You get this:

    image

    As opposed to this:

    image

    Regarding the Extract Tool/Refine Edge, cannot help you there, don't use them.

    Trev.
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015

    Skip, I forgot to really refer to your question of that background 'staying'.

    I think from past experience, *only* on Macs, you could 'see' the background of anything under Photoshop like your desktop behind the surrounds of any individual image you were working on, I don't know what the latest thing is but that's the way it is, close images until all gone, Phototshop itself stays open as you have not closed Photoshop fully, no different to browsers, close all the tabs, (unless you set it up in preferences to close on last tab closed) the browser itself remains open and say Word, you close documents, Word still remains open.

    Maybe someone with a Mac can get you to 'hide' PS if you are working on an Image in its own window if not tabbed???

    That's the only other thing I can think of and not having a Mac cannot test it.

    Trev.
  • if you convert your raw files to DNG upon import into LR there is no sidecar file. the metadata changes/adjustments can be saved right into the file using Ctl-S. these files can be sent to someone and opened maintaining the changes without having to export a LR catalog.
  • Thanks Trev. Yes, I have 'tabs' now and it's super confusing. I like it better when everything is in its own separate window. 

    OK, it's a PS background and not a palette. But the thing is, with PS 4 (as well as 3 and 5) it wasn't there. I could open and work on a photo and still see the folder of images behind it. Then, if I closed that photo I was working on, there is my folder of images. Now....... the big gray palette/background is still there and blocking everything. It's totally different from 3, 4 and 5. It's a huge pain to have to close it each time in order to see and access my folder of photos. I can slide it aside but then the problem is that when I open a new photo it opens way to the side (on top of gray palette/background). So I have to slide it back to the center before working on it. With PS 4, you just open you photo and it opens with the desktop behind it and all the tools are on the sides and top and you can access them but still see everything else. Now I got this big gray wall blocking everything. This isn't new. I have had PS 6 for a few years. I tried it when I first got it and this was one reason I hated it. 

    Maybe you see something different than what I see since you aren't using a Mac?

    Oh well, OK, I guess I have to live with it until I can get 4 back. I'll try playing around with some options in Preferences. Or maybe I need to do the subscription thing, if it doesn't have this gray wall.

    Thanks for all your help Trev!

  • Thank you Groomsphoto. I do not have LR. I also don't use DNG files. But thank you for the info!
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015
    Skip,

    I am seeing precisely what you mean with your screenshots, and I was told only yesterday by a guy who uses a Mac, that you can have a 'clear' background somewhere and he's using CC, you will have to go through preferences I am afraid to see.

    Regarding Tabs. Well, if you don't like turn off the preferences, but also, another thing you can click/hold on the Tab Bar at top of an Image then 'drag' it out and it will then become its own 'window' and vice-versa, you can click top of image bar and drag it back up near the top below the menu and you will see a 'blue line' appear, release, and it will 'pop' back into Tab Mode.

    Also, this 'sliding things out of the way' to see the desktop background, why? You can minimise PS once all the images are closed anyway, and on a PC if I hold the Alt Key (Option on Mac) and hit my Tab key I can toggle through all the programs/windows open until I get to the one I want, but, it's easier (on a PC) to just click on the Icon of a program in the Taskbar which toggles Minimise/Maximise so the window either opens up fully or minimises.

    I am only suggesting things, up to you to use or not. It was just the one thing I said earlier that if you work on an image with super bright colours surrounding it as in windows/desktop/other images, that will influence your brain re colours on editing. But entirely once again up to you, I don't want to impose my way of working on anyone whatsoever, it's just my philosophy on why.

    I also have my colour scheme set to a neutral gray, to also help overcome that.

    Anyhow, I hope you get your beloved CS4 back soon so you are comfortable once again.

    Cheers,
    Trev.


  • Thanks again Trev! Interesting about your friend who uses Mac. I will investigate getting a clear background and encouraging to know it might be possible. I do love CS4 but I was told by a tech person at Imagenomic that Portraiture (the airbrushing software I use) doesn't work well with CS4 and Yosemite, Apple's latest operating system. He strongly discouraged me from going back to CS4. So we will see. 

    You cannot minimize the pesky CS6 palette/background. You can. But as soon as you open a photo it pops back up. You cannot minimize it while a photo is open. Hence the need to slide to the side, as least while I am editing photos. If I'm doing something else then yes, can be minimized. I see what you mean about editing against a gray background rather than the desktop re colors. Thanks for that tip.

    Yes, I just find it easier to see everything when it's all in separate windows rather than tabs... oh well, to each his own.  
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015
    Fair enough, very strange you cannot minimise PS on a Mac with an open image, don't you have 3 buttons top left (right on PC) for Minimise/Restore/Close?

    Trev

    EDIT: Anyone else with a Mac test this please? Thanks!


  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015
    Skip,

    Finally I got onto my mate with a Mac.

    2 things:

     a) you most definitely can minimise Photoshop with an image open, you have 3 radial buttons top left, with Red/Green/Yellow, the Yellow button has a little 'minus' symbol in it which will minimise, click and Photoshop will then 'dock' at the bottom with a little arrow apparently saying Photoshop is Open (but minimised) so you can 'restore' it back to full size.

    On a PC it goes to a Task Bar and highlighted so you know it's 'active' but minimised.

     b) to get your 'clear' background so you can 'see' your desktop and any other stuff opened, go to: Menu Bar/Window, and down near the bottom you will have 'Application Frame', UNcheck that and bingo, you now have your beloved 'clear' background back.

    I am surprised no one in here with a Mac did not respond actually, but maybe all viewers are on PC or did not know.

    So, to reiterate you can Minimise with an image open and you can get your 'clear' background back.

    Trev.

  • TrevTrev Moderator
    He just sent me screenshots Skip....



    image


    image
  • Wow!! Thank Trev! That Application Frame trick sounds like it might be my golden ticket to happiness! Will try asap when I am back at computer. And I'll report back.

    I do know about the yellow minimize button but thanks. But it doesn't minimize the palette/background while a photo is open. Maybe I can take an iPhone vid to show you I'm not crazy. As soon as I close the photo then I can minimize the palette. I wonder why your friend can do it and I can't?

    But it's ok!!! Because Application Frame is going to save the day!
  • Ok, this is fantastic. The Application Frame trick worked. This is really awesome. Thank you Trev. 

    On the minimize question, you are right, if a jpeg is open, I can minimize the palette/background. If however a RAW file is open I cannot. In fact if a RAW file is open the three radio buttons are all useless and inoperable. But all that is mute!!! Because App Frame saved the day.

    Thank you again!
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    edited August 2015
    Good to hear.

    Re RAW open, you didn't mention you had Raw/s open, and of course you cannot minimise it, as it's an integral part of Photoshop, and in fact Photoshop must be open to even access it, it's not a 'standalone' Raw converter program, and you must close it to even access Photoshop itself.

    Say you had an image open in Photoshop, then went Ctrl/L (Cmd/L Mac) and it brings up your Levels Palette, you then cannot do anything with Photoshop like minimise/close, etc. until you 'commit' that Levels Palette by either saying OK or cancel.

    Unlike Lightroom which is a 'standalone' program and you can switch between LR/PS easily, in fact you can edit a file in Photoshop from within Lightroom and bring it back to LR with the edits you did to it in Photoshop.

    But good to hear you are finally a happy camper once again.

    :)

  • Ok that's for that explanation Trev. Yes, happy camper over here. Thanks to you. I think photo editing is going to go a lot faster today. 
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