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Flash with high ceiling and red walls

wendywendy Member
edited June 2011 in flash & lighting
I am doing my first wedding in a couple of weeks. Attached are the photo's which I received from the bride (made with her mobile phone)
I assume the natural light will be coming from the side (the setting is not known). This will mean I have to add some light from the other side, however this is a red wall.
I wanted to use bounce flash (with the foamy thing), use a high ISO (postprocessing with noise reduce plugin, I have a nikon D300, 24-70 2.8 lens).
However I am really concerned about the walls: will it give a strange red light, will I be hard to correct since the ambient light is also there? Or is it better to use an omnibounce set to 45 degrees?

Any tips are welcome! Thanks
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Comments

  • Off the top of my head:
    1) Can you visit the facility to take test shots beforehand?
    2) In certain situations, you might be able to point the flash behind you and towards the ceiling to keep the bounced flash closer to white/daylight WB.
    3) By strategically moving the bride/groom/whoever towards the ambient light areas and if the ambient light is adequate, you might be able to do fill flash.
    4) Lastly, shoot in RAW and fix it in post processing.
  • MatrixphotoMatrixphoto Member
    edited June 2011
    Hi Wendy
    You have a couple of factors you need to consider,

    A. Which way will the couple be standing?

    I would get the Couple to ether face the window or have there back towards it .
    Try not to get them with the window to the side. You can ask the minister to help you with this .

    If they are facing the window you can just use your flash direct at -2 to -3 FEC for fill.

    If there backs are towards the window , you have a couple of options here.

    1. You can use Omni bounce to give frontal fill

    2 BFT , take some test shots and use the Kelvin WB setting the higher the Kelvin the more blue,

    I agree with Stephen Shoot in Raw!!!!!

    Hope this helps

    Lou Recine
  • wendywendy Member
    hi, unfortunately I am not able to previsit the location and the bride is not able to tell me the setting of the room. As the room is more deep with the window on its side I am afraid I will have side-way light. Will there be any solution if this is the setting?
    Thanks for the tips for the front and back at window, I do prever the BFT but hope the ceiling is not to high. I always shoot in RAW, hope the potential red in the pictures are good to change with synchronizing.

    Thanks for your comments!
  • wendywendy Member
    I just heared that the setup will be with windows on the side, and faces looking to the light which you can see on photo (3). So I have tungsten light from the front, daylight to from the side and a red wall on the other side.. how must I solve this?
    Would it be good to gel the flash? I only have the standard gells provided with the Nikon sb900, think the tungsten gel is TN-A2? Or will that mess up the colours even more?

    Hope someone can give me some tips!
  • StephenStephen Member
    edited June 2011
    1) Shoot in RAW for this, because it looks like you have mixed light sources that probably will require post-processing.

    2) I would set my white balance to whatever light is most dominant. If the people are standing by the window, the sunlight is probably the strongest light source. If they are away from the window or it's towards evening, white balance should probably be tungsten, and then I gel the flash.

    3) If you think your flash is brighter than both the internal lighting and daylight, set your WB to flash and post-process the WB.

    If you cannot visit the site far before the wedding, can you visit the location an hour before the wedding? Even one hour should give you some opportunity to take test shots.

    The tungsten gels that I use are Rosco gels CTS and 1/2 CTS. Those are available at B&H and Adorama, if you are near the NYC area.

    At worst, if you think you can't switch the WB on the fly during the wedding, set your WB to one setting, and stick to it for the whole event. You can change the WB on all the photos as a batch process in Lightroom/Aperture/Photoshop/etc.
  • wendywendy Member
    Thanks Stephan, I ordered the Rosco gels: hope to receive them tomorrow.
    I live in the Netherlands, not so close the NYC ;)

    Thanks for the tips!
  • Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
    wendy said: I wanted to use bounce flash (with the foamy thing), use a high ISO (postprocessing with noise reduce plugin, I have a nikon D300, 24-70 2.8 lens).
    However I am really concerned about the walls: will it give a strange red light, will I be hard to correct since the ambient light is also there? Or is it better to use an omnibounce set to 45 degrees?

    Wendy, looking at those shots of the room, I'd bounce flash up and behind me like usual, using the BFT.

    There's nothing that I see there that the D300 and your fast zoom (with an SB-900) can't handle.

    You will most definitely pick up a color cast from the wall, but you are shooting in RAW. So that would be a breeze to fix.

    I wouldn't gel my flash in this situation, since the flash is going to pick up a very warm color cast anyway.
  • ZenonZenon Member
    That is good to know about red. As I recall from your - Just Give Me the F-Stop B&H videos blue and green walls are not good as they will absorb red (I believe). You suggest to turn those into B&W and call them art.
  • wendywendy Member
    Hi there,

    I did bounce flash up the ceiling and a bit to back left of me, and it turned out pretty well. The light coming from the windows was dominant, so I didn't gel my flash.
    See photo 6 and 7 of www.wendydefotograaf.nl/klanten/bruiloft
    I do think I should have taken a bit more red out.

    But for a first wedding I think I didn't do to bad :)

  • StephenStephen Member
    edited July 2011
    Wendy, those photos look good. I agree the skin tone is a little too red, but for what it is, you managed to capture the background and the subjects. Neil's techniques at work!
  • TrevTrev Moderator
    Hi Wendy,

    Yes, those pics look pretty darn good for a first time, actually a lot better than I was a 'first time' all those many years back in film days. [aaarrrrgggh] lol.

    You've had a flying start to your wedding initiation and obviously having such media these days as the internet will help you tremendously for the future. Once I hit the 'ether waves' over a decade ago, it was 'research', 'research' and more 'research' gobbling up everything I could, since digital was becoming such 'the future' of our industry.

    Keep reading, practicing and mainly enjoying what you do.

    All the very best for your future career ahead.

    Cheers,
    Trev
  • Hi there,

    My next wedding has wooden walls and a high black ceiling, please see attached photo.
    image

    Would this room not be to large/to coloured to bounce flash? I have a Nikon D300 with which I don't like to go higher as Iso 800. Not sure how I should handle this. I can hire a D700, which probably would be the safest way.

    I was also thinking about buying a small softbox for on-camera flash (they are for sale up to the size of 20x30cm). This then does give nice soft light. Does anyone have experience with this?

    Hope to receive some tips, thanks!
  • Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
    wendy said: See photo 6 and 7 of www.wendydefotograaf.nl/klanten/bruiloft
    I do think I should have taken a bit more red out.
    Hi there Wendy,

    I think the gallery has "moved on" since you posted.
    Can you give a link to the specific images again?
  • Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
    Zenon said: As I recall from your - Just Give Me the F-Stop B&H videos blue and green walls are not good as they will absorb red (I believe). You suggest to turn those into B&W and call them art.
    My answer seemed flippant perhaps, but it is a workable solution to an image with problematic WB.
  • Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
    wendy said: Would this room not be to large/to coloured to bounce flash? I have a Nikon D300 with which I don't like to go higher as Iso 800. Not sure how I should handle this. I can hire a D700, which probably would be the safest way.

    I was also thinking about buying a small softbox for on-camera flash (they are for sale up to the size of 20x30cm). This then does give nice soft light. Does anyone have experience with this?
    That room does look very large WITH wooden panels .. for bounce flash to easily work. Especially if you can't go over 800 ISO.

    A small softbox on your on-camera flash would definitely improve the look of the photos if you had to shoot with direct flash.

    Sometimes this is the most practical solution.
  • Hi Neil,

    Yes, I updated the gallery with some more recent weddings. Those two images are now on page 3, third row, first two pictures. They are however updated, I took some red out :)

    Regarding the large wooden room with black ceiling: Thanks for the advice Neil, I'll just get myself an on camera softbox. It seems like a safe idea to me.
    However if I would rent a D700, what would you then advice for such a room? Would you risk trying to bounce?

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