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flash photography during the wedding ceremony in church

sambahrisambahri Member
edited August 2011 in wedding photography
hi Neil
u said …(My starting point usually is to get the ambient light as close as possible to the correct exposure. Then the flash is used to “clean up” the light in the photo. This relates to the recent post on having the flash ‘ride on top of’ the ambient light. The flash is just enough to lift the exposure to the correct levels. As such, the flash is usually not the dominant light source. It’s there to augment the available light.)..so what i understand from this is :_
1- your available light in the church is your main light…do u measure it from the general ambient in the church or from the subject you photograph?.
2- the flash is the fill light to lift the contrast and shadows..do u fire your flash with or without flash exposure compensation?….thanks

Comments

  • Neil vNNeil vN Administrator
    Hi there ...

    Re question 1.
    It's a little but of both. I have to have my exposure close to correct, but so that that ambient is a little under-exposed ... but at settings which count in my favour:
    for example:
    a high enough shutter speed to help minimize camera shake (say, 1/125)
    an aperture which still has some 'bite' to it, and not too shallow a depth-of-field (say f3.5 or f3.2)
    an ISO which is not incredibly high (say, 1600 ISO)

    So somewhere around there, with a test shot, I'll see that my ambient is under.
    Then I add TTL flash.


    Re question 2
    Usually at zero compensation as a start, since the flash here isn't mere fill-flash .. but is playing a considered part in getting to my correct exposure.

    For me, fill-flash is where the ambient is pretty much correct already, and the flash just helps with contrast and lifting shadow detail.
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