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Nikon D800 settings for jpg

johnwizzjohnwizz Member
edited June 2013 in home
I thought I would share my jpg settings on my D800 and invite you guys to comment.

Shooting Menu:
JPEG compression: Optimal Quality
Set Picture Control: Standard; Sharpening 4; Contrast +1; Brightness 0; Saturation +1; Hue 0
Color Space: sRGB
Active-D-Lighting: N (only works for jpgs)

Have I forgotten anything? I would be interested in hearing your comments.
Greetings from Switzerland!

Comments

  • Not to be "that guy" but a suggestion is to consider shooting RAW rather than JPG, and then you would not care too much about your in-camera JPG settings. (Although you probably want to set it relatively neutral because the review image on the LCD uses the in camera JPG settings even if you are only shooting RAW.) I used to shoot primarily JPG until I got onto Lightroom, and that changed it entirely for me and made it so convenient that I only shoot RAW now. I find I have more latitude in post processing adjustments, and much more control fixing white balance issues since WB is not baked into the RAW the way it is with JPG.

    In terms of the settings you have, if I were shooting JPG only - Active D off (I don't like it), and I would probably increase the sharpening a little more from where you have it. Like you, I would probably go +1 on contrast and saturation.
  • It's good to know what to do when using a D800 to shoot JPGs which can happen if I want to shoot some action.
  • I'm interested in why you find JPGs better than RAW for action?
  • johnwizzjohnwizz Member
    edited June 2013
    Thanks for your interest Nikonguy.

    So far, I have found out that when shooting action with my Nikon D800 and D7000 and with the camera in CH mode that:
    a) shooting raw and the camera starts to slow down after 10 pics.
    b) shooting jpg and the camera will click away for 20-25 pics.

    I went to a road junction yesterday and took some pictures of passing cars. The D800 worked best with the jpg only setting and the car's number plate was in focus all the time.

    I'm preparing myself for a Nikon Action Workshop mit Christian Egelmair in Zurich on Monday 17th June and will report back!
    h***s://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gepDM9vMnxQ
    (It's in Swiss German)

    Incidentally, I didn't buy the D800 to shoot action but portrait, weddings, etc. and it's interesting to learn it's limitations regarding sports, etc.
  • My $0.02 is while the D800 is not a sports camera because of the relatively slow frame rate, it can be, particularly if you're not just holding the shutter in CH mode and banging off frame after frame until the buffer fills. I personally don't shoot action that way, and I would not trade off shooting RAW just for getting a longer buffer run with JPG. But again, that's only my opinion.

    Your test with the license plate on cars whizzing by would relate to autofocus settings and your own technique rather than RAW vs. JPG.

    My AF settings that I generally use (and I find these good for action):
    - Back button only focus (so a4 set to AF-ON Only)
    - a1 AF-C priority set to release
    - a3 Focus tracking with lockon turned OFF
    - Use AF-C autofocus all the time
    - Dynamic 9 point area mode (particularly when tracking fast moving subjects)
    - Use center point if you can
    - For static subjects, I press AF-ON once to focus, recompose carefully if needed, and then shoot.
    - For moving subjects, I can press and hold AF-ON and pan to track the subject and shoot at will while holding AF-ON down.

    I would be interested hearing what you learn at the workshop, thanks.
  • JerryJerry Member
    I'm with NikonGuy on this one. I use the same techniques and settings as he does
  • Thanks. I will report back if the workshop happens. I'm waiting for confirmation.
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