photography: using your lens’ bokeh as a design element

Using your lens' bokeh as a design element

In previous articles we could see how a fast 85mm can be used for shallow depth-of-field to shoot nearly anywhere by melting away the background. There's another aspect to this - the bokeh of the lens. The bokeh is a reference to how the quality of the background blur is rendered by a lens. It can be smooth, or have  Read more inside...

depth-of-field .. f2.8 vs the rest

aperture and depth of field

A question that came up in the forum recently was whether an 70-200mm f4 zoom would give you the same kind of look that an f2.8 zoom would. For me, the f2.8 aperture is essential, especially with a telephoto zoom. For the same scenario, it gives me a higher shutter speed than the f4 zoom. Or I can use a lower ISO. More importantly,  Read more inside...

using narrow depth-of-field & great bokeh

creating a background with narrow depth-of-field & great bokeh

Shooting images for the review of the Nikon 85mm f1.4G AF-S lens, it struck me how truly superb this lens is. It improves on the legendary Nikon 85mm f1.4 AF-D lens in some key areas. (For me the updated lens was an immediate upgrade.) But ultimately, you could get similarly beautiful images with  Read more inside...

bokeh – a few notes

bokeh - quality of lens blur

The way that a specific lens renders the out-of-focus areas in the background (ie, the bokeh of the lens), is always an interesting aspect of any lens' behavior. If the out of focus areas show hard edges, or highlights with a kind of double edge, then the bokeh can appear intrusive. Then it is called harsh bokeh. If the out of focus areas  Read more inside...

shallow depth-of-field does not mean good bokeh

shallow DoF / depth-of-field is not the same thing as great bokeh

The first thing you might notice in this image is our super-cute model, Johannie. Next you will probably notice either: - the strange background pattern, (due to this lens' bokeh), - or the wafer-thin depth-of-field of the Nikon 50mm f/1.4D used wide open - or the lighting on her, (a  Read more inside...